Normal dietary fat contains mostly long-chain triglycerides (LCT). Medium-chain triglycerides are more ketogenic than LCTs because they generate more ketones per unit of energy when metabolised. Their use allows for a diet with a lower proportion of fat and a greater proportion of protein and carbohydrate,[3] leading to more food choices and larger portion sizes.[4] The original MCT diet developed by Peter Huttenlocher in the 1970s derived 60% of its calories from MCT oil.[15] Consuming that quantity of MCT oil caused abdominal cramps, diarrhoea and vomiting in some children. A figure of 45% is regarded as a balance between achieving good ketosis and minimising gastrointestinal complaints. The classical and modified MCT ketogenic diets are equally effective and differences in tolerability are not statistically significant.[9] The MCT diet is less popular in the United States; MCT oil is more expensive than other dietary fats and is not covered by insurance companies.[3]
I have great respect for Harvard Medical School. I notice that they support their readers posting comments and I am most appreciative of the article and all the many thoughtful comments by the readers. The readers seem to have the most expertise here and I hope that the doctor who wrote the article will think long and hard about the comments by readers. After 35 years of clinical practice in mental health, I notice that all issues of emotion involve medical issues, nutrition, and the gut bacteria. I would say that these issues and all of the executive brain functions seem to improve with ketogenic principles. For those that apply it in a flexible and smart manner, it appears to improve every area of their lives. I strongly encourage the author of the article to take one class via The Institute for Functional Medicine. If he is open to more learning he can take more classes and get certified. I’m sure a fine doctor, he will be an even better doctor and personally healthier, if he gets more training. Are we all open to new learning(especially us healthcare providers)?

In the mid-1990s, Hollywood producer Jim Abrahams, whose son's severe epilepsy was effectively controlled by the diet, created the Charlie Foundation to promote it. Publicity included an appearance on NBC's Dateline programme and ...First Do No Harm (1997), a made-for-television film starring Meryl Streep. The foundation sponsored a multicentre research study, the results of which—announced in 1996—marked the beginning of renewed scientific interest in the diet.[1]

The reason you eat a balanced diet, which includes fruits, vegetables, dairy, protein, grains, legumes, nuts, and seeds, is to get a variety of nutrients your body needs to stay healthy. You can do so on a lower calorie diet *and* successfully lose weight. However, on the keto diet, grains, legumes, and fruit are pretty much eliminated (berries, watermelon, and apples are allowed sparingly). These food groups provide a ton of nutrients including fiber, phytonutrients, and antioxidants like vitamins A and C. Keto dieters are also known to have constipation because of the lack of fiber in their diet. (FYI, here are the supplements you should take if you're on the keto diet.)
You may also be a great candidate for the Keto diet if you experience migraines, joint pain, muscle weakness or mental fatigue. In addition, "Keto diet can be beneficial for mental health conditions like depression, autism and Alzheimer's". Other than that, "you can also follow this diet plan if you're trying to get pregnant since it improves fertility", she notes.

Just this week, a 25,000-person study presented at the European Society of Cardiology Congress in Munich suggested that people on the lowest-carb diets had the highest risk of dying from cancer, cardiovascular conditions, and all other causes. Another study, published this month in the Lancet, also found that people who followed diets that were low in carbs and high in animal proteins had a higher risk of early death compared to those who consumed carbs in moderation. (The opposite was true, however, for low-carb dieters who opted for plant-based proteins over meat and dairy.)


hello, i am interested in trying the ketogenic diet. i have hypothyroidism and cannot seem to lose any weight no matter what i do or eat. i need to lose about 20 pounds. do you think this diet can help me to lose weight and would it be good for my low thyroid? also, i am not a very active person…i have herniated disc in my lower back and have to be careful how i move, bend, or stretch, etc. however, i can get on my indoor exercise bike and ride it for about 10 min. per day.
Ketones—the molecules produced during fat metabolism on the keto diet and other very low-carb diets—are acidic. “When they start to build up in our blood, the blood becomes more acidic,” Notte says. One of the ways the body balances high acid levels is by using a base like calcium, she explains. “The body pulls this alkaline mineral from our bones.” In the long term, chronic calcium loss can lead to low bone density, osteoporosis, and fractures. Try these 15 ways to boost bone health.
“This diet has changed my life. I always find it too easy to cheat because healthy foods are just awful, or so I thought. Once I read the Keto Fit Diet recipes my mouth was watering and I couldn’t wait to get started making these meals. They are delicious, my friends and family would never know I’m on a diet if it weren’t for the 35 lbs I’ve lost in the last 3 months.”

The ketogenic diet has been studied in at least 14 rodent animal models of seizures. It is protective in many of these models and has a different protection profile than any known anticonvulsant. Conversely, fenofibrate, not used clinically as an antiepileptic, exhibits experimental anticonvulsant properties in adult rats comparable to the ketogenic diet.[57] This, together with studies showing its efficacy in patients who have failed to achieve seizure control on half a dozen drugs, suggests a unique mechanism of action.[55]


This is where we have to depart! Sorry to say but you’re on your own. You should have plenty of leftovers that are frozen, ready, and waiting! I know a lot of you out there have trouble with timing and are busy people – so making sure that some nights you make extras to freeze is important. All those leftovers you have in the freezer? Use them up! Create your own meal plan, at first using this as a guide, and then completely doing it yourself. Once you get the hang of it, it’ll be a sinch – I promise you 🙂
“These past 60 days have changed my life. I found out about it from a friend on Facebook and never looked back…. It has quickly become my lifestyle and it’s definitely one of those fad diets you find everywhere. Aside from weight loss, I’ve gained a confidence that I never knew I had inside. My relationship with my husband and family has improved exponentially. When my body reached ketosis, my life changed along with my pant size!!! Keto Fit Diet for the win!”

Keto is a very low carb diet, often it means no more than 20 net carbs a day. I had been low carb for 4 years prior to going keto a year ago, my daily carb intake was 50-70 grams a day and the carbs were coming mostly from non starchy vegetables. But yet even being lower carb than the standard American diet, it wasn’t enough for me to still not crave sugar and carbs.
Biggest and most remarkable change is, no binges in 60 days. This might be a record for me. In fact, this month things have significantly changed with my eating disorder/food addiction. Cravings come and I can easily say no. Hunger comes and it's not a problem to wait it out until my next meal. Snacking is almost obsolete. Portion sizes are much smaller and quickly fill me up. The only struggle I have is that I repeat a lot of food and sometimes I just want more variety.
Short for “ketogenic diet,” this eating plan is all about minimizing your carbs and upping your fats to get your body to use fat as a form of energy, says Scott Keatley, R.D., of Keatley Medical Nutrition Therapy. While everyone's body and needs are slightly different, that typically translates to: 60 to 75 percent of your calories from fat, 15 to 30 percent of your calories from protein, and 5 to 10 percent of your calories from carbs.
The ketogenic diet—also known as "keto"—has become the latest big thing in weight-loss plans, touted recently by celebs like Jenna Jameson, Mama June, and Halle Berry. The diet involves cutting way back on carbohydrates, to 50 grams a day or less, to help the body achieve a state of ketosis, in which it has to burn fat (rather than sugar) for energy.
Net carbs are what we track when following a ketogenic diet. This calculation is pretty straightforward. Net Carbs = Total Carbs – Fiber. For example, one cup of broccoli has 6g of total carbs and 2.4g of fiber. That would mean one cup of broccoli has 3.6g of net carbs. We count Net Carbs  because dietary fiber does not have a significant metabolic effect. 
If you’re looking to get a jump start on your health and fitness goals this year, you may be thinking about trying the ketogenic diet. Maybe you’ve heard the phrase before — it’s a huge diet buzzword — but aren’t sure what it means. Here’s a primer: The ketogenic diet is an eating plan that drives your body into ketosis, a state where the body uses fat as a primary fuel source (instead of carbohydrates), says Stacey Mattinson, RDN, who is based in Austin, Texas.
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