I’m following the ketogenic diet and I find it very easy, pleasant and varied. I can even say that my diet today is more varied than the previous one. I do not intend to leave this diet and I cannot really see why. My initial focus was not to lose weight, I’ve always been lean, but to feel better, well disposed. And I got it! I am very pleased, I have read a lot about it (including scientific literature) and I have influenced other people who need to lose weight or improve some aspects of their health. But from the beginning I went on my own way, without the help of a nutritionist because I did not want to suffer the influence of others’ ideas.
Aude, Y., A. S, Agatston, F. Lopez-Jimenez, et al. “The National Cholesterol Education Program Diet vs a Diet Lower in Carbohydrates and Higher in Protein and Monounsaturated Fat: A Randomized Trial.” JAMA Internal Medicine 164, no. 19 (2004): 2141–46. doi: 10.1001/archinte.164.19.2141. jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/article-abstract/217514.
The low glycaemic index treatment (LGIT)[48] is an attempt to achieve the stable blood glucose levels seen in children on the classic ketogenic diet while using a much less restrictive regimen. The hypothesis is that stable blood glucose may be one of the mechanisms of action involved in the ketogenic diet,[9] which occurs because the absorption of the limited carbohydrates is slowed by the high fat content.[5] Although it is also a high-fat diet (with approximately 60% calories from fat),[5] the LGIT allows more carbohydrate than either the classic ketogenic diet or the modified Atkins diet, approximately 40–60 g per day.[3] However, the types of carbohydrates consumed are restricted to those that have a glycaemic index lower than 50. Like the modified Atkins diet, the LGIT is initiated and maintained at outpatient clinics and does not require precise weighing of food or intensive dietitian support. Both are offered at most centres that run ketogenic diet programmes, and in some centres they are often the primary dietary therapy for adolescents.[9]
Also, when you eliminate sugar and high-carb foods from your daily diet, "your body is able to heal itself and detox from the accumulated inflammation that it is constantly fighting," That means less brain fog, improved cognition and brain health. Consequently, the improved mental clarity makes it easier for you to make smart food choices, adds the nutritionist.
How often you eat is also up to your personal preference. "For most people, I recommend three to four meals per day with a few healthy keto snacks in between," says Dr. Axe. "This ensures that you're getting a good mix of protein and fat all day long to keep you feeling energized and satisfied." That being said, he encourages people to listen to their bodies and tune in to when they're truly hungry. "If you find that you feel better eating five to six smaller meals spread throughout the day, do what works best for you."
One of my co workers who eats fast food everyday for breakfast and frozen meals for lunch tired to warn me about how my bacon and cabbage is going to cause me gout, because last week her husband bought regular beacon instead of turkey bacon and now she has gout ?!?! I just said wow gout is tough, careful those frozen meals might flare it up She has seen me drop from 292 to 215 since January eating veggies and meat, while she literally eats processed crap 2 meals each day The hate is real people
Also, when you eliminate sugar and high-carb foods from your daily diet, "your body is able to heal itself and detox from the accumulated inflammation that it is constantly fighting," That means less brain fog, improved cognition and brain health. Consequently, the improved mental clarity makes it easier for you to make smart food choices, adds the nutritionist.
You’re transitioning. Your body is equipped to process a high intake of carbs and a lower intake of fat. Your body needs to create enzymes to be able to do this. In the transitional period, the brain may run low on energy which can lead to grogginess, nausea, and headaches. If you’re having a large problem with this, you can choose to reduce carb intake gradually.

After receiving Keto Comfort Foods as a gift from a friend that knew we were “doing Keto,” I was inspired to get this “how” and “why” book to get back on track. First, I just love the recipes in the Comfort Foods book—every one we’ve tried has been a big hit. So I’m planning to get more of her recipe books—they all look awesome! The “Dairy-Free” and “Restaurant Favorites” are next on my list.
Following a ketogenic diet, your food intake would be roughly 5 to 10 percent carbohydrates, 15 percent protein, and 75 to 80 percent fat. This would be a pretty seismic shift for most people who follow a standard American diet; according to a 2016 report by the CDC, the average American adult’s diet is 50 percent carbohydrates, 16 percent protein, and 34 percent fat. Your average day on a ketogenic diet might include eggs, cheese, assorted meats and small amounts of nuts and avocados, and modest amounts of vegetables that are low in carbs, like spinach and lettuce.
The American Heart Association’s recommendations for controlling cholesterol include getting more fiber and limiting your intake of saturated fat, both of which would be extremely difficult on a ketogenic diet. While it’s true that research around saturated fat is still evolving, making room for good sources of fiber and unsaturated fats, which reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, and allowing for a more balanced intake of nutrients, is ideal. In any case, you should check with your doctor before you start a ketogenic (or any new) diet, especially if you have any health conditions like high blood pressure or high cholesterol.

Some athletes swear by the ketogenic diet, not just for weight loss but for improved performance in their sport, as well. But Edward Weiss, PhD, associate professor of nutrition and dietetics at Saint Louis University, doesn’t buy it. “I hear cyclists say all the time that they’re faster and better now that they’re on keto, and my first question is, 'Well, how much weight did you lose?'” he says.
Having the meals delivered each week also meant I knew what I would be eating for dinner that night—something that's key to sticking to the keto diet all day. The plan revolves around meal planning and counting your macronutrients, and if you go over your percentages in any category (people generally eat 70 percent fat, 20 to 25 percent protein, and 5 to 10 percent carbs while on keto), you could kick yourself out of ketosis. If that happens, then you go right back to burning carbs for fuel instead of fat, which is the whole point of keto. Knowing in advance what meal would be on the table that night made it easier to adjust the rest of my day, so I felt confident that I wouldn't mess up my macro counting.
After receiving Keto Comfort Foods as a gift from a friend that knew we were “doing Keto,” I was inspired to get this “how” and “why” book to get back on track. First, I just love the recipes in the Comfort Foods book—every one we’ve tried has been a big hit. So I’m planning to get more of her recipe books—they all look awesome! The “Dairy-Free” and “Restaurant Favorites” are next on my list.
The ketogenic diet reduces seizure frequency by more than 50% in half of the patients who try it and by more than 90% in a third of patients.[3] Three-quarters of children who respond do so within two weeks, though experts recommend a trial of at least three months before assuming it has been ineffective.[9] Children with refractory epilepsy are more likely to benefit from the ketogenic diet than from trying another anticonvulsant drug.[1] There is some evidence that adolescents and adults may also benefit from the diet.[9]
Cauliflower is a great base for low-carb meals and is popping up everywhere—especially on keto diet blogs. This cauliflower soup by All Day I Dream About Food is super simple to whip up in the Instant Pot and tastes decadent thanks to cheese, bacon, and sour cream. Plus, it only has 5.5 grams of net carbs and delivers nearly 3 grams of fiber thanks to the cauliflower.

In its 2016 report “Healthy Eating Guidelines & Weight Loss Advice,” the Public Health Collaboration, a U.K. nonprofit, evaluated evidence on low-carbohydrate, high-fat diets. (The Keto diet falls under the LCHF umbrella.) Among 53 randomized clinical trials comparing LCHF diets to calorie-counting, low-fat diets, a majority of studies showed greater weight loss for the Keto-type diets, along with more beneficial health outcomes. The collaboration recommends weight-loss guidelines that include a low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet of real (rather than processed) foods as an acceptable, effective and safe approach.
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