Those issues can be part of what's known as the “keto flu,” Warren says. Other side effects of the keto diet, all of which are tied to carb withdrawal, can include lightheadedness, nausea, mental fog, cramps, and headaches, in addition to tiredness. Luckily, the keto flu doesn't usually last more than a week—which is coincidentally about when people start to see the number on the scale go down, says Warren.
If you’re a newbie planning your weekly keto diet plan, make the meals as easy as possible. A keto breakfast, for example, can take advantage of many classic breakfast foods, including eggs, bacon, sausage, and ham. Eggs are real winners in the keto world. They’re extremely versatile, easy to cook, and have just half a gram of carbs but 6 g of protein and 5 g of fat.
But generally speaking, if you plan to follow a ketogenic diet, you should aim to consume less than 10 percent of your total calories from carbohydrates per day. The remaining calories should come from 20 to 30 percent protein and 60 to 80 percent fat. That means if you follow a daily 2,000-calorie diet, no more than 200 of your calories (or 50 grams) should come from carbs, while 400 to 600 calories should come from protein and 1,200 to 1,600 should come from fat. (There’s a reason this plan is also called a high-fat, low-carb diet!)

A systematic review in 2018 looked at sixteen studies on the ketogenic diet in adults. It concluded that the treatment was becoming more popular for that group of patients, that the efficacy in adults was similar to children, the side effects relatively mild. However, many patients gave up with the diet, for various reasons, and the quality of evidence inferior to studies on children. Health issues include high levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high total cholesterol, and weight loss.[23]
A ketogenic diet helps control blood sugar levels. It is excellent for managing type 2 diabetes, sometimes even leading to complete reversal of the disease. This has been proven in studies. It makes perfect sense since keto lowers blood-sugar levels, reduces the need of medications and reduces the potentially negative impact of high insulin levels.
“Mark is doing that keto diet,” his wife, Kelly Ripa, said on Live with Kelly and Ryan on Tuesday. “Since he’s been doing that I’ve been on a mostly carb diet. He’ll have the burger but he won’t have the bun. Then I see that little bun sitting there with burger juice on it and the condiments and yeah, I’m not a big meat eater so I just eat that bun with the lettuce and the tomato and I’m a happy camper.”
Option 3: "Make your own keto 'lunchable' with cubes of grilled chicken, a slice of nitrate-free ham, cheese cubes, pickle slices, a hard-boiled egg, a few raw grape tomatoes, raw veggies like cauliflower or broccoli, a few almonds or walnuts, guacamole, and ranch dressing," says Stefanski. (Looking for something meat-free? Here are 29 Vegetarian Keto Recipes for Plant-Based Eaters.)

Back to this book, though! We pretty much figured out how to live a Keto lifestyle from the internet and Pinterest. Some good things happened and we knew we were on the right track, BUT THIS BOOK PUTS IT ALL TOGETHER! It also deals with the misguided information we had randomly collected and now we are on track with the science and recipes to support our efforts! Honestly, one of the things that drew me to Maria’s books and perspective was that she is so lean herself! Not “skinny” but very lean with no extra fat at all. I don’t need to lose a bunch of weight and my husband doesn’t either, but 20 pounds of fat would be great, and to be lean like that would be amazing. So she’s inspiring that way, too, and I can trust her recipes because they are how she and eats and lives (as well as her family). This book explains how it all works, scientifically and practically. (from the perspective of both Maria and her husband, Craig). I also appreciate the “realness” and vulnerability—she has many personal stories to let the reader know it hasn’t always been this way for her and how living a Keto-adapted life has changed her body and outlook. I’d recommend this book before any others for someone wanting to get started with the ketogenic diet. And then her recipe books...!!!

We are brazilian, living in Brazil. My daughter, Isabel, 21y. o., born in 1996, has syndrome of deficiency of Glut1. She was diagnosed around her first year of life. At that time her baby bottle, her begining diet meal, was 50ml water plus 50ml oil plus vitamin. Since then, which means, for 20 years, she is under this diet. For almost 18 years under 4:1 proportion. At this right moment 3:1. The only problem she had since started the diet were kidney stones in 2002. Nothing else. Grateful to the diet she doesn’t take any kind of medicine to avoid seizures. Her health is perfect, no colesterol at all. We are at your will for any issues related to her health.


When some people attempt a ketogenic diet, they experience the “keto flu” during the period of time their bodies are adapting to the diet. This is a period of feeling lightheaded, lethargic, irritable, and unmotivated. “It typically lasts one to three days, and may very well be just the result of dehydration. A drop in insulin can impact renal sodium retention such that sodium and fluids are excreted more readily. This also acts to lower blood pressure,” Goss says.
Josh Axe, a doctor of natural medicine and clinical nutritionist, estimates that about 25% of people who try a ketogenic diet experience these symptoms, with fatigue being the most common. “That happens because your body runs out of sugar to burn for energy, and it has to start using fat,” he says. “That transition alone is enough to make your body feel tired for a few days.”
If you’re looking to get a jump start on your health and fitness goals this year, you may be thinking about trying the ketogenic diet. Maybe you’ve heard the phrase before — it’s a huge diet buzzword — but aren’t sure what it means. Here’s a primer: The ketogenic diet is an eating plan that drives your body into ketosis, a state where the body uses fat as a primary fuel source (instead of carbohydrates), says Stacey Mattinson, RDN, who is based in Austin, Texas.
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