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Hi Paola, I just wanted to confirm how much of the can of tomatoes is required. When I look at the metric measurements it’s 1/2 a 14 ounce can. When I switch to US cups it says 14 ounce can. Could you let me know which is correct please? Btw I have tried a few of your recipes and all have been amazing. Can’t wait to try more. Especially the cinnamon toast crunch!
Hi Stacey, I can’t give medical advice and definitely recommend following your doctor’s recommendations. You can ask him/her if low carb would be better suited for you. Also, you may want to double check with him/her if the kidney concern was related to high protein, because that is a common misconception about keto – it is not a high protein diet/lifestyle.
Ive bern on ompresole proton prohibiter..which I went off because 1. Caused me to have sibo ane 2. Caused me to have pneumonia seversl times a year. The sibo, intestinal distress was hideous, I got told by my last primary I would pretty much have to live with this, my homeopathic Doctor said no, the antibiotics from pneumonia treatment plus my multiple contrasts test (ive lost count) messed everything up. Eating clean is amazing..goes against everything ive bern taught snd convinced it wouldn’t work…till I tried it. So any doubters, educate yourselves.
We now know the ketogenic diet has many other therapeutic benefits. One of them being that it trains the body to burn fat (in place of sugar) for fuel making the ketogenic diet an excellent choice for weight loss and improvement in body composition. The ketogenic diet is also excellent at treating and preventing insulin resistance like as found in type 2 diabetes and can even lower diabetic medication dosage or even prevent one’s need for blood sugar lowering medication. Weight loss through a ketogenic diet can also help lower cholesterol and triglycerides and improve overall cardiovascular function as well.
As is in the case of GABA, the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) hypothesis works against the hunger-suppressive role of KD: it has been demonstrated that the hypothalamic ROS increase through NADPH oxidase is required for the eating-inhibitory effect of insulin (Jaillard et al., 2009); moreover it has been demonstrated that there is a ROS-dependent signaling pathway within the hypothalamus that regulates the energy homeostasis, and that activation of ROS-sensitive mechanisms could be sufficient to promote satiety (Benani et al., 2007). On the other side, KBs decreases mitochondrial production of ROS by increasing NADH oxidation in the mitochondrial respiratory chain (Maalouf et al., 2007).
Some clinicians[37] regard eliminating carbohydrates as unhealthy and dangerous.[38] However, it is not necessary to eliminate carbohydrates from the diet completely to achieve ketosis. Other clinicians regard ketosis as a safe biochemical process that occurs during the fat-burning state.[35] Ketosis, which is accompanied by gluconeogenesis (the creation of glucose de novo from pyruvate), is the specific state that concerns some clinicians. However, it is unlikely for a normally functioning person to reach life-threatening levels of ketosis, defined as serum beta-hydroxybutyrate (B-OHB) levels above 15 millimolar (mM) compared to ketogenic diets among non diabetics, which "rarely run serum B-OHB levels above 3 mM."[39] This is avoided with proper basal secretion of pancreatic insulin. People who are unable to secrete basal insulin, such as type 1 diabetics and long-term type II diabetics, are liable to enter an unsafe level of ketosis, eventually resulting in a coma that requires emergency medical treatment.[citation needed] The anti-ketosis conclusions have been challenged by a number of doctors and advocates of low-carbohydrate diets, who dispute assertions that the body has a preference for glucose and that there are dangers associated with ketosis.[40][41]
“When the body is in ketosis, it lowers the blood pH level, causing the blood to become acidic. To counter this, the body takes calcium away from the bones,” she says. “The increased acidity in the body also increases uric acid, which can lead to the formation of kidney stones.” Therefore, it goes without saying that due to the stress an extremely low-carb diet can have on the body, those with kidney damage shouldn’t try to achieve ketosis or attempt the ketogenic diet. (10)

If you’ve decided to move forward in trying the keto diet, you will want to stick to the parameters of the eating plan. Roughly 60 to 80 percent of your calories will come from fats. That means you’ll eat meats, fats, and oils, and a very limited amount of nonstarchy vegetables, she says. (This is different from a traditional low-carb diet, as even fewer carbs are allowed on the keto diet.)
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