Hi Cyn, The numbers are general guidelines but will vary depending on many factors, such as activity level, insulin resistance, weight and more. There is no single magic number, just conventional recommendations that are a good starting point. I will have a macro calculator coming soon that will help determine what is best for each person, but even then it’s an approximation. The only way to know for sure is to test. If keto is your goal, it’s usually best to start lower and then see if you can stay in ketosis when increasing.
You could certainly use butter, but I’m not sure how that would be more appealing to him if he thinks fat is the enemy. It’s tough to get heart patients to go against the “conventional wisdom” we’ve been fed for so many decades. They have a right to be fearful, but I would suggest offering him research that shows fat isn’t the enemy at all. For what it’s worth, after 6 months of heavy keto (my testing period, though I’ve been keto longer than that) with lots of fats, including butter, bacon, and avocados, my cholesterol and triglycerides dropped! And I’m not the only person to have those same results. Best of luck!
If you’re looking to get a jump start on your health and fitness goals this year, you may be thinking about trying the ketogenic diet. Maybe you’ve heard the phrase before — it’s a huge diet buzzword — but aren’t sure what it means. Here’s a primer: The ketogenic diet is an eating plan that drives your body into ketosis, a state where the body uses fat as a primary fuel source (instead of carbohydrates), says Stacey Mattinson, RDN, who is based in Austin, Texas.
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