Debbie, Congrats on your weight loss, that’s awesome! We haven’t tried this recipe with bone-in chicken thighs, but if you want to use them to make this recipe we recommend cooking the thighs in the oven and then pulling the meat off the bone, shredded it, and mixing it with the sauce. The objective with this recipe is to cook the chicken (any way you like, poached, baked, grilled, or even rotisserie) until it can be shredded, and then mix the shredded chicken with the creamy sauce. To cook the creamy sauce on the stovetop, we recommend crisping the bacon in a saucepan and then removing it and adding the water and spices. Once the water is simmering, add the cream cheese a bit at a time (slightly softened would probably work best), whisking until it’s incorporated. Cooked this way, you may need to add a splash more liquid (water or broth, if you prefer) to the sauce, because some of the liquid will evaporate off as the cream cheese melts down. Finally, stir in the cooked shredded chicken and shredded cheddar, and serve! If you try it this way, please let us know how it goes!
You want to keep your cheats to none. Be prepared, make sure you’re eating what you need to be satiated (“full”), and make sure you’re satisfied with what you’re eating. If you have to force yourself to eat something, it will never work out in the end. This is just a guideline on how you can eat on a ketogenic diet, so you’re very welcome to change up what kind of foods you eat!

Two comments: first of all, I’ve only discovered your site recently because (a) I. no longer eat refined sugar, and (b) after a year of no ice cream, I bought an ice cream maker and am making maple syrup sweetened ice cream, with varied success, which brings me to my comments/questions: first, this recipe calls for xylitol or erythritol, and as a person with three dogs, may I just mention that dogs can be killed by consuming xylitol. For this reason, I don’t use it, because they adore ice cream, and I can’t resist giving them a little occasionally…and I might forget. This is important!! Second: I keep reading coconut milk ice cream recipes (and others as well) that jump up and down and insist that these recipes makes this amazing, creamy ice cream, and….it doesn’t. I have made ice cream with coconut milk (full-fat) And coconut cream and it is usually icy, if delicious. Not creamy. Same for my one or two forays into making dairy ice cream to see how that would work. All of it is full of ice crystals and while it may be delicious, creamy it is not, although ice cream made with cashews and plant milk does pretty well. My theory is that commercial ice cream is filled with chemicals and stabilizers and the like, and is therefore what we call creamy. All the ice cream I have made with my Cuisinart ice cream maker freezes hard as a rock, and again–while it may be delicious, it is NOT creamy. Is it possible that I’m doing something wrong? I can’t see that I’m doing anything differently from the various vegan and/or dairy recipes I’ve seen. I’ve used both maple sugar and maple syrup for sweetening, as well as occasionally coconut sugar. My most successful ice cream has been made with plant milk and maple syrup. Getting everything as cold as possible before freezing helps, of course, but it is NEVER creamy. Thoughts?

This is where we have to depart! Sorry to say but you’re on your own. You should have plenty of leftovers that are frozen, ready, and waiting! I know a lot of you out there have trouble with timing and are busy people – so making sure that some nights you make extras to freeze is important. All those leftovers you have in the freezer? Use them up! Create your own meal plan, at first using this as a guide, and then completely doing it yourself. Once you get the hang of it, it’ll be a sinch – I promise you 🙂


I get many questions about intermittent fasting, the health benefits, the weight loss benefits, and the like. People normally use intermittent fasting for both the energy and mental clarity it can offer. But it’s not just good for that. It can offer breakthroughs of plateaus and even benefits in nutrient uptake in exercise. We go more in depth to intermittent fasting in Week 3 and 4, so keep your eyes peeled!

If you want to slam a protein shake post-workout, that's probably fine as long as you've got room for it in your macros. But shoot for one that is very low—like, zero—in carbohydrates. Pure isolates, such as Signature 100% Whey Isolate, are extremely low in carbohydrate. If you struggle to fit fat in during the day, toss a tablespoon of olive oil in with your shake. You won't taste it, and it gives a quick 13-14 grams of fat.
You want to keep your cheats to none. Be prepared, make sure you’re eating what you need to be satiated (“full”), and make sure you’re satisfied with what you’re eating. If you have to force yourself to eat something, it will never work out in the end. This is just a guideline on how you can eat on a ketogenic diet, so you’re very welcome to change up what kind of foods you eat!

In terms of weight loss, you may be interested in trying the ketogenic diet because you’ve heard that it can make a big impact right away. And that’s true. “Ketogenic diets will cause you to lose weight within the first week,” says Mattinson. She explains that your body will first use up all of its glycogen stores (the storage form of carbohydrate). With depleted glycogen, you’ll drop water weight. While it can be motivating to see the number on the scale go down (often dramatically), do keep in mind that most of this is water loss initially.
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