Recently, many of my patients have been asking about a ketogenic diet. Is a ketogenic diet safe? Would you recommend it? Despite the recent hype, a ketogenic diet is not something new. In medicine, we have been using it for almost 100 years to treat drug-resistant epilepsy, especially in children. In the 1970s, Dr. Atkins popularized his very-low-carbohydrate diet for weight loss that began with a very strict two-week ketogenic phase. Over the years, other fad diets incorporated a similar approach for weight loss.
Absolutely nothing jumps out as the cause of the (insert word that rhymes with fall but begins with "st" instead of "f") . I even went full-nerd and did correlation analysis on about 15 measures, and the highest I got on correlation was 0.4, for deficit (although this was for the raw data, not a smoothed out trend). But the last two weeks of it, I ate near maintenance, and even had a couple 150 carb gram days, to try to jostle my metabolism. Then I went straight back to strict keto and a calorie deficit. This seems to have not only ended my (insert word that rhymes with fall but begins with "st" instead of "f"), but accelerated my weight loss.
The ketogenic diet is a mainstream dietary therapy that was developed to reproduce the success and remove the limitations of the non-mainstream use of fasting to treat epilepsy.[Note 2] Although popular in the 1920s and 30s, it was largely abandoned in favour of new anticonvulsant drugs.[1] Most individuals with epilepsy can successfully control their seizures with medication. However, 20–30% fail to achieve such control despite trying a number of different drugs.[9] For this group, and for children in particular, the diet has once again found a role in epilepsy management.[1][10]

This lighter soup by I Breathe I’m Hungry offers plenty of fat with coconut milk, chopped pistachios, and coconut flakes. Spices like curry powder and onion flakes make it flavorful. It will even please the non-keto dieters in your family as it’s low in calories, only 117 per serving, and is dairy-free and Whole30 compliant, too. One serving has only 6 grams of net carbs.
Yancy WS Jr, Westman EC, McDuffie JR, Grambow SC, Jeffreys AS, Bolton J, Chalecki A, Oddone EZ, “A randomized trial of a low-carbohydrate diet vs orlistat plus a lowfat diet for weight loss,” Arch Intern Med. 2010 Jan 25;170(2):136-45. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20101008?itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum&ordinalpos=2.
Like most diets, the ketogenic diet is not a one-size-fits-all answer to all of our health and weight hopes and dreams. It might be enjoyable for some people, especially in the short term, but that doesn't mean it will be a fit for everyone. The experts we talked to for this post agreed that although it may lead to short term (water) weight loss, it might not be optimal as a sustainable weight loss solution. St. Pierre explains the way he sums it up for his clients: “I let them know that there isn't a universal approach that works for everyone, and that restrictive diets like keto can be hard for folks to stick to long-term.”
A: The most common ways to track your carbs is through MyFitnessPal and their mobile app. You cannot track net carbs on the app, although you can track your total carb intake and your total fiber intake. To get your net carbs, just subtract your total fiber intake from your total carb intake. I have written an article on How to Track Carbs on MyFitnessPal.

Welcome to the Keto Fit Diet. We have been in the weight loss industry for over 10 years now and have gone through every possible thread of research combined with clinical studies and our background in the healthcare industry in order to create the most successful weight loss method available. We have all struggled with getting rid of those unwanted pounds, using whatever unsuccessful means we could find. We have all tried the “miracle in a bottle” supplements, magic tricks and ridiculous diets to achieve our health and weight goals only to come up short or lose motivation before we ever see any real results. Well after 10 years of research, trial, error, and experience we have finally found the perfect, easy to use, solution to achieving our health and weight loss goals; the Keto Diet.
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That’s why many health experts are concerned about people on the keto diet, especially those who try it without the guidance of a doctor or nutritionist. Doctors say that high-fat diets like this one may raise cholesterol levels, and some studies suggest that they increase the risk of diabetes. Some have even called it a “cardiologist’s nightmare.”
It’s important to remember that the goal of any dietary change is to promote a healthy lifestyle, so make sure to select a meal plan you can envision yourself following long term. If you know you will not be able to comply with such stringent carbohydrate restrictions for years to come, the ketogenic diet is most likely not the right choice for you.
Before starting, ask yourself what is really realistic for you, Mattinson suggests. Then get your doctor’s okay. You may also work with a local registered dietitian nutritionist to limit potential nutrient deficiencies and talk about vitamin supplementation, as you won’t be eating whole grains, dairy, or fruit, and will eliminate many veggies. “A diet that eliminates entire food groups is a red flag to me. This isn’t something to take lightly or dive into headfirst with no medical supervision,” she says.
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