The ketogenic diet is based on the principle that by depleting the body of carbohydrates, which are its primary source of energy, you can force the body to burn fat for fuel, thereby maximizing weight loss. When you consume foods that contain carbohydrates, the body converts those carbohydrates into glucose, or blood sugar, which it then uses for energy. (1)


Josh Axe, a doctor of natural medicine and clinical nutritionist, estimates that about 25% of people who try a ketogenic diet experience these symptoms, with fatigue being the most common. “That happens because your body runs out of sugar to burn for energy, and it has to start using fat,” he says. “That transition alone is enough to make your body feel tired for a few days.”
My point here is that the warnings about the ketogenic principles are well taken and well documented. My concern is implications that this is a fad. I don’t use the word diet with my patients and I’m concerned that the principles behind the label and the real results that these readers have commented on might get minimized. I have found it best to encourage patients to read authors like: Stephen Phinney, Jeff Volek, Patricia Daly, and Charles Gant and the be partners with their doctors and check blood work as they move along. I am not for or against the article. If ketogenic principles offer people enduring, satisfying, and cohesive change then why not read about its potential and flexilbity?
I’m discouraged to see that nowhere in the article nor in the comments is there a mention of a diet’s best fit to genetics. Consider if someone is an APOE E2 carrier and/or has certain polymorphisms of the APO5 gene. These are quite rare in Okinawa but much more prevalent in the USA (12% of the population). According to a number of well-designed studies, these genetic characteristics point to a higher fat, lower carbohydrate diet as beneficial and even a “moderate” carb diet as problematic.

Jump up ^ Ketogenic "eggnog" is used during induction and is a drink with the required ketogenic ratio. For example, a 4:1 ratio eggnog would contain 60 g of 36% heavy whipping cream, 25 g pasteurised raw egg, saccharin and vanilla flavour. This contains 245 kcal (1,025 kJ), 4 g protein, 2 g carbohydrate and 24 g fat (24:6 = 4:1).[17] The eggnog may also be cooked to make a custard, or frozen to make ice cream.[36]
I can't stress enough how out of the ordinary this is for pre-keto Spyder. He tried going to the Gym a few times, but it was always SO DAMN HARD to get there and he never felt like he belonged. Always felt like the other fit, healthy people in the Gym were silently laughing and judging him for being so overweight. So he stopped going and had a few beers to make him feel better... Which totally helped (make the problem worse). Pre-keto Spyder was a bit depressed and probably a bit of an alcoholic too, but that's a bit cultural in NZ (excuses excuses!)
In Asia, the normal diet includes rice and noodles as the main energy source, making their elimination difficult. Therefore, the MCT-oil form of the diet, which allows more carbohydrate, has proved useful. In India, religious beliefs commonly affect the diet: some patients are vegetarians, will not eat root vegetables or avoid beef. The Indian ketogenic diet is started without a fast due to cultural opposition towards fasting in children. The low-fat, high-carbohydrate nature of the normal Indian and Asian diet means that their ketogenic diets typically have a lower ketogenic ratio (1:1) than in America and Europe. However, they appear to be just as effective.[53]
To get the most benefit from the Keto diet, you should stay physically active. You might need to take it easier during the early ketosis period, especially if you feel fatigued or lightheaded. Walking, running, doing aerobics, weightlifting, training with kettlebells or whatever workout you prefer will boost your energy further. You can find books and online resources on how to adapt Keto meals or snacks for athletic training.
The ketogenic diet achieved national media exposure in the US in October 1994, when NBC's Dateline television programme reported the case of Charlie Abrahams, son of Hollywood producer Jim Abrahams. The two-year-old suffered from epilepsy that had remained uncontrolled by mainstream and alternative therapies. Abrahams discovered a reference to the ketogenic diet in an epilepsy guide for parents and brought Charlie to John M. Freeman at Johns Hopkins Hospital, which had continued to offer the therapy. Under the diet, Charlie's epilepsy was rapidly controlled and his developmental progress resumed. This inspired Abrahams to create the Charlie Foundation to promote the diet and fund research.[10] A multicentre prospective study began in 1994, the results were presented to the American Epilepsy Society in 1996 and were published[17] in 1998. There followed an explosion of scientific interest in the diet. In 1997, Abrahams produced a TV movie, ...First Do No Harm, starring Meryl Streep, in which a young boy's intractable epilepsy is successfully treated by the ketogenic diet.[1]
Back to this book, though! We pretty much figured out how to live a Keto lifestyle from the internet and Pinterest. Some good things happened and we knew we were on the right track, BUT THIS BOOK PUTS IT ALL TOGETHER! It also deals with the misguided information we had randomly collected and now we are on track with the science and recipes to support our efforts! Honestly, one of the things that drew me to Maria’s books and perspective was that she is so lean herself! Not “skinny” but very lean with no extra fat at all. I don’t need to lose a bunch of weight and my husband doesn’t either, but 20 pounds of fat would be great, and to be lean like that would be amazing. So she’s inspiring that way, too, and I can trust her recipes because they are how she and eats and lives (as well as her family). This book explains how it all works, scientifically and practically. (from the perspective of both Maria and her husband, Craig). I also appreciate the “realness” and vulnerability—she has many personal stories to let the reader know it hasn’t always been this way for her and how living a Keto-adapted life has changed her body and outlook. I’d recommend this book before any others for someone wanting to get started with the ketogenic diet. And then her recipe books...!!!
Temperatures are dropping fast, which means soup should be your new best friend. And when that soup is thick, rich, and high in protein and fat, it’ll really stick to your bones on a chilly night. This soup by Cast Iron Keto has only 6.7 grams of net carbs and tons of filling fats from the heavy cream and cream cheese. Add sliced jalapeño on top for a little kick.
I actually clicked on the story just to see if they included anything about it’s use in managing chronic migraine. I have chronic migraine, basically intractable. Nothing has helped. I’ve tried medications, meditations, and everything in between including a bunch of dietary changes. Keto is my next consideration. I’m happy to hear it helped you! Thanks for sharing
Advocates for the diet recommend that it be seriously considered after two medications have failed, as the chance of other drugs succeeding is only 10%.[9][30][31] The diet can be considered earlier for some epilepsy and genetic syndromes where it has shown particular usefulness. These include Dravet syndrome, infantile spasms, myoclonic-astatic epilepsy and tuberous sclerosis complex.[9][32]
You can have a completely smooth transition into ketosis, or…not. While your body is adapting to using ketones as your new fuel source, you may experience a range of uncomfortable short-term symptoms. These symptoms are referred to as “the keto flu.” Low-sodium levels are often to blame for symptoms keto flu, since the kidneys secrete more sodium when you’re in ketosis, says Volek. A few side effects:
Starting back up about 3 months ago, I intended to Gym once or twice a week on my OMAD days, then eat normally (16-8 IF) for the rest of the week. I very soon found that I'd get to work early, knock out a bunch of work in the morning before anyone else had woken up enough to bug me, head off to the Gym, then spend the afternoon full of energy fixing all the problems other people caused by being half-asleep in the morning! When I didn't go the the Gym there was a noticeable lack of effs to give in the afternoon.
If you’ve decided to move forward in trying the keto diet, you will want to stick to the parameters of the eating plan. Roughly 60 to 80 percent of your calories will come from fats. That means you’ll eat meats, fats, and oils, and a very limited amount of nonstarchy vegetables, she says. (This is different from a traditional low-carb diet, as even fewer carbs are allowed on the keto diet.)
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